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jtotheizzoe:

Message From the Moon
At first glance, these probably come across as little more than hastily painted watercolor sketches of the moon. That’s precisely what they are, actually. Attractive, yes, but certainly not high art.  
But hiding in their shadows lies a greater significance. The squiggled edges of that bleeding ink bear an observation that altered the heavens themselves. Or at the very least, our view of them.
The hand that traced these orbs belonged to none other than Galileo Galilei. They were included in his 1610 work Sidereus Nuncius (“The Sidereal Message”, which would make a great band name), the first scientific text based on telescope observations. To understand the significance of his illustrations, it helps to understand the world in which he drew them.

In 1610, cosmology, not that it had much to show for itself as a science, was still based on the ideas of Aristotle, who by this time had been dead for 18 centuries. So current! Copernicus’ observation that the Earth orbited the sun, first published in 1543, had begun to challenge Aristotelian supremacy, it wasn’t exactly a popular idea. 
Aristotle’s cosmological beliefs were based on the idea that the heavens were made of a perfect substance called “aether”, and therefore the circular motions and spherical shapes of heavenly bodies were also perfect. Earth, he claimed, was inherently imperfect, as were all the things that existed upon it. Everything in the heavens was awesome, and Earthly matter was inherently “just okay”, even if its name was Aristotle. This was one of the reasons people found Copernicus’ claims so hard to swallow. The imperfect Earth among the perfect heavens? Heresy!
Enter Galileo and his humble 20x telescope, in 1609. At the time, in Aristotelian fashion, the moon, being of the heavens, was assumed to be a perfect sphere, its dark and light areas just splotches upon the billiard-ball-smooth lunar surface. I imagine it took Galileo about 7 seconds of lunar observation to realize that was not the case.

The terminator, that line that separates the moon’s illuminated face from its dark one, is jagged as a crocodile’s smile. I’ve seen it myself through modern telescopes, and I must say, it’s really something to witness how light and shadow break over a distant crater’s edge. Galileo painted this in his sketches above, inferring that the moon in fact had a rough and crater-marked face. This meant that not only was Earth not the center of the universe, as Copernicus had shown, but the heavens themselves were imperfect, just like Earth.
Scientists would go on to realize that the orbits of heavenly bodies were not perfect circles, nor were the bodies perfect spheres, and that everything up there is made of the same stuff as everything down here. It was either a huge demotion for the heavens, or a great promotion for Earth, I’m not sure.
Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius also included newly detailed maps of the constellations and the mention of four moons of Jupiter (although detailed observations of those were still centuries away), but it was his drawings of our moon that bore the most impact on future astronomical science, realigning the heavens with a single stroke of the brush.
Keep on drawing, and keep on looking up.
(You can read an English translation of Sidereus Nuncius here. If you’re hungry for more selenology, tour through these historical maps of the moon. Tip of the telescope to Steve Silberman for tweeting these sketches.)

jtotheizzoe:

Message From the Moon

At first glance, these probably come across as little more than hastily painted watercolor sketches of the moon. That’s precisely what they are, actually. Attractive, yes, but certainly not high art.  

But hiding in their shadows lies a greater significance. The squiggled edges of that bleeding ink bear an observation that altered the heavens themselves. Or at the very least, our view of them.

The hand that traced these orbs belonged to none other than Galileo Galilei. They were included in his 1610 work Sidereus Nuncius (“The Sidereal Message”, which would make a great band name), the first scientific text based on telescope observations. To understand the significance of his illustrations, it helps to understand the world in which he drew them.

In 1610, cosmology, not that it had much to show for itself as a science, was still based on the ideas of Aristotle, who by this time had been dead for 18 centuries. So current! Copernicus’ observation that the Earth orbited the sun, first published in 1543, had begun to challenge Aristotelian supremacy, it wasn’t exactly a popular idea. 

Aristotle’s cosmological beliefs were based on the idea that the heavens were made of a perfect substance called “aether”, and therefore the circular motions and spherical shapes of heavenly bodies were also perfect. Earth, he claimed, was inherently imperfect, as were all the things that existed upon it. Everything in the heavens was awesome, and Earthly matter was inherently “just okay”, even if its name was Aristotle. This was one of the reasons people found Copernicus’ claims so hard to swallow. The imperfect Earth among the perfect heavens? Heresy!

Enter Galileo and his humble 20x telescope, in 1609. At the time, in Aristotelian fashion, the moon, being of the heavens, was assumed to be a perfect sphere, its dark and light areas just splotches upon the billiard-ball-smooth lunar surface. I imagine it took Galileo about 7 seconds of lunar observation to realize that was not the case.

The terminator, that line that separates the moon’s illuminated face from its dark one, is jagged as a crocodile’s smile. I’ve seen it myself through modern telescopes, and I must say, it’s really something to witness how light and shadow break over a distant crater’s edge. Galileo painted this in his sketches above, inferring that the moon in fact had a rough and crater-marked face. This meant that not only was Earth not the center of the universe, as Copernicus had shown, but the heavens themselves were imperfect, just like Earth.

Scientists would go on to realize that the orbits of heavenly bodies were not perfect circles, nor were the bodies perfect spheres, and that everything up there is made of the same stuff as everything down here. It was either a huge demotion for the heavens, or a great promotion for Earth, I’m not sure.

Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius also included newly detailed maps of the constellations and the mention of four moons of Jupiter (although detailed observations of those were still centuries away), but it was his drawings of our moon that bore the most impact on future astronomical science, realigning the heavens with a single stroke of the brush.

Keep on drawing, and keep on looking up.

(You can read an English translation of Sidereus Nuncius here. If you’re hungry for more selenology, tour through these historical maps of the moon. Tip of the telescope to Steve Silberman for tweeting these sketches.)

a-mutter:

「C86「艦娘のみあるき。」」/「こるり」の作品 [pixiv] #pixitail
mikeymcmichaels:

Alexandra Blake - by Mikey McMichaels - 052416IMG_1412

mikeymcmichaels:

Alexandra Blake - by Mikey McMichaels - 052416IMG_1412

デスクワークや家事など一般的な生活を送っているときは、尿や便、皮膚からの蒸発、呼気などで1日に1.5~2.5㍑の水分が失われるので、同量の水を飲むことでバランスがとれる。
一般的な食事をとっている人なら、食事に約1㍑の水が含まれている上、体内の代謝で生まれた水もあるので、飲み水としては1~2㍑をこまめにとることが大切だ。ティカップ1杯程度(約150cc)を1~2時間ごとにとるといい。
寝ている間は水を飲めないので朝は水分不足になり、それが脳梗塞などの引き金になることもある。“寝る前にもトイレが近くならない程度に飲む。夜中にトイレに起きたときには、口に少し含む程度飲むと、脳梗塞の予防になる”(飯野教授)
スポーツをしたり、屋外で仕事・作業をしたりする人の場合は、かいた汗に匹敵する水分を加える必要がある。まず屋外に出たらコップ1杯の水分補給をすること。ノドの渇きに応じて飲めばいいが、たくさん汗をかいたときは低ナトリウム血症予防のため、適度の塩分を補うことも重要だ。
masakokubo:

"T for Typewriter"
I made this to celebrate the day (23rd June 1868) the first practical modern typewriter was patented (my image is a mixture of several typewriters).

masakokubo:

"T for Typewriter"

I made this to celebrate the day (23rd June 1868) the first practical modern typewriter was patented (my image is a mixture of several typewriters).

若いころ想像していた「老いる」というのは「いままで出来たことができなくなっていく」というものだった。でも実際には少し違う部分があった。「出来なくなる」以前に「したくなくなる」「興味がなくなる」「どうでもよくなる」という感覚がある。
Twitter / hyuki (via igi)

高野文子、12年ぶりのコミックを刊行します

高野文子 著「ドミトリーともきんす」を9月25日に刊行します。
前作『黄色い本』から12年。新作のテーマに選んだのは「科学者たちの言葉」でした。
朝永振一郎、牧野富太郎、中谷宇吉郎、湯川秀樹・・・。日本の優れた科学者たちが遺した文章を、なぜいま読み返すのか。その意義を、架空の学生寮「ドミトリーとも きんす」を舞台に、そこに暮らす「科学する人たち」と一組の母娘の交流を通じて丁寧に描いていきます。

表題作「ドミトリーともきんす」に加え、連載への布石となった短編「球面世界」「Tさん(東京都在住)は、この夏、盆踊りが、踊りたい。」の二篇を収録。
大判サイズで絵の 魅力をあますことなく伝える、ファン待望の一冊です。

中央公論新社 (via tkr)
booby4649:

バスケス。

booby4649:

バスケス。

水分補給に特別な配慮が必要なのは、乳幼児・学童・高齢者だ。
たとえば乳幼児は自分の意志で水を飲むことができない。
ミルクを飲んでいるからと安心していると脱水症状になることもある。
また、高齢者はノドの渇きを感じにくいため、自分でも気づかないうちに脱水症状を起こすことがる。飯野教授は

  • “この時期の脱水症状のサインとして重要なのは脇の下の状態”と話す。
  • 脇の下は普段からわずかに湿っているものだが、寒くもないのにカラカラに乾くのは、脱水症状のサインと考えていい。
このほか、[立ちくらみ]や[便秘]もあるので要注意だ。

aixia-scraploveculture:

再生パンドンと並んで最強クラスなんだそうです

darylfranz:

スイスの日本食レストランの地雷っぷりがヒドいwww手羽先wwwwwwwww - ハムスター速報